Tubman-Mahan Gallery

Photo: (c) Zandra Chestnut 2010

After The Center for Green Urbanism opened as a green business incubator, the amount of wall space, inviting light and creative air,  inspired the creation of the Tubman-Mahan Gallery. Over the past year, the gallery has hosted a variety of shows highlighting local artists and surrounding broad themes including  Making Herstory6 and Mama Earth

If you are interested in sponsoring an event, becoming a partner, or have questions – please send an e-mail to: tubmanmahangallery@gmail.com. We will respond as quickly as possible!

Curator

Since January 2011, Stephanie Shapiro has been with the Tubman-Mahan Gallery, first as an intern, and as curator since July. Stephanie comes with a background in art history, museum administration and sustainability. Inspired by a class taught by co-author, Sarah Brophy of The Green Museum, Stephanie has worked with museums and galleries of all sizes to help them decrease their carbon footprint. Currently she serves as the Communications co-chair of the American Association of Museum’s Green Professional Interest Committee and works at the Smithsonian Institution. She believes in the Center’s mission of integrating art and nature, as well as getting the Ward 7 and DC communities involved in sustainability and the Tubman-Mahan Gallery. With help from the Advisory Commitee, Stephanie organizes all exhibitions and events through the Tubman-Mahan Gallery. Please e-mail tubmanmahangallery@gmail.com for any questions or inquiries.

Why Tubman-Mahan?

Harriet Tubman is the epitome of a heroine beyond compare.  Because of her indefatigable courage, energy and dedication to serving her family and over 300 slaves, she was able to lead them to safety and freedom. Notably, she “once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, [that] in all of her journeys she ‘never lost a single passenger'”(1). Between her runaway in 1849 and 1860, Tubman had made 19 trips back and forth from the slave to free country. She never completely recovered from being hit in the head with a two-pound weight by an overseer, was illiterate and was abandoned by her husband  went on to be one of the most well-known liberators, a nurse,and spy after she had returned time and time again to the South to rescue not only her family, but complete strangers from slavery. Known as Moses and General Tubman,  her resilience, heart, tenacity and drive are what makes Harriet Tubman a role model and heroine.

Dennis Mahan was a professor and military officer who defended the Union during the American Civil War. He worked in the corps of engineers and was the principal assistant professor of engineering at the United States Military Academy at West Point. After spending time abroad in France, Mahan returned to West Point and became Dean. In 1836, Mahan wrote a textbook on field fortification entitled: Treatise on Field Fortifications, Containing Instructions on the Methods of Laying Out, Constructing, Defending and Attacking Entrenchments, With the General Outlines Also of The Arrangement, the Attack and Defense of Permanent Fortifications which became known as the “bible of field fortifications” which was used well after the Civil War. (2)  is the namesake of Fort Mahan, the national park site located near the Center for Green Urbanism.

References:
(1) “Harriet Tubman,” Africans in American: Judgement Day: People & Events, PBS: Public Broadcasting Service, web accessed  09 June 2011.  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1535.html
(2) “Dennis Hart Mahan,” A Civil War Biography, Civil War Interactive & BlueGrayDaily, web accessed 09 June 2011. http://www.civilwarinteractive.com/Biographies/BiosDennisHartMahan.htm.
Additional Resources:
Harriet Tubman photograph
Dennis Mahan photograph
www.harriettubman.com
http://www.harriettubmanbiography.com/
http://www.nps.gov/cwdw/historyculture/dennis-hart-mahan.htm

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